Can we 'unlearn race?' Why de-emphasizing racial identity could help fix political divisions



Can we 'unlearn race?' Why de-emphasizing racial identity could help fix political divisions

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30 Ноя 2019 в 12:39pm
As South Bend, Indiana, Mayor Pete Buttigieg’s support rises in the Democratic primary polls in key early states like Iowa, is his sexual identity turning off some black voters? That was a storyline which took hold last week, and was subsequently pushed back against by two prominent columnists in The New York Times and The Washington Post. The underlying subtext of both sides of this debate is identity — black, gay and every intersectional identity in between. Into this landscape enters a fascinating new book with a heterodox way of looking at race: “Self Portrait in Black and White: Unlearning Race” by Thomas Chatterton Williams, a contributing writer at The New York Times Magazine and a visiting รูเล็ตฟรี
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ข่าวฟุตบอลวันนี้ fellow at Bard College’s Hannah Arendt Center for Politics and Humanities. It’s a personal story, but also a story of America — its history, its present and its future. As the title suggests, Williams has a simple but loaded suggestion: de-emphasize race, and we’ll make progress as a culture. “If we are ever to progress, we must first slough off these old skins we’ve been forced to don,” he writes. Williams, who speaks of his own racial identity throughout the book (a black father and a white mother) says a de-emphasis on race will lead to de-escalation of the increasingly overheated political and cultural environment in America. “Everybody needs to step back and deescalate our investment in these abstractions and try to find the transcendent humanism that connects us, and the universal values and the national values,” he told me in a recent interview.